When we go to the hospital, we find many patients with all sorts of diseases. Some have broken legs, hands, sick eyes, cases of flu, coughs, name it. As we wait in line to be attended to, we all hope that we can get well as soon as possible. We imagine how much better our lives would be if our ailment was done away with, or dealt with, somehow.

 

We do not begin to tell others that they shouldn’t feel pain because it’s not a leg that’s broken, just a hand. Or not to worry that they can’t see, because others can’t walk. That would be ridiculous. The fever that would be despised by someone with a full-blown flue could result in a coma and then death, if unattended to. So we don’t despise and dismiss the pain of others.

 

In the same way, I implore us, let us not dismiss the pain of grieving mums. Someone may have lost a child, and another person’s house may have burnt down. Don’t compare them. Someone may have miscarried and another may have gotten, seen and lived with their child for a while before the child died. Don’t compare them. Each one feels her pain with extreme sensitivity and depth. It’s not any easier for any grieving mum because Syria was bombed. How now?

 

So, please, let’s avoid dismissing and making light the pain and loss of grieving mums. It’s not small to them, it’s monumental. Even months and years later. And just because someone’s arm is broken, it doesn’t make my dislocated knee less painful or absolutely painless. Let’s be sensitive to grieving mums.